Share stuff on #femedtech for International Women’s Day 2018 and beyond #IWD2018

Rainbow stripes superimposed with #femedtech
Femedtech image created by Maren Deepwell

It’s International Women’s Day today * and there are events, celebrations and protests , archives all across the world and on Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, and other social media. Maren Deepwell, CEO of ALT , has already linked International Women’s Day to Open Education Week and #femedtech in a blog post that highlights the role of open practice in promoting equality.

#Femedtech is a hashtag on Twitter that can link feminists who practice in education technology (and that is an expansive category) and who have an interest in supporting each other and how things might be different.

Here is something you can do today and in the future – please tweet (including #femedtech) links to :

  • resources and examples that help us wrangle the tech in a feminist sort of way
  • research that casts a feminist perspective on learning technology
  • feminist who make a difference in edtech
  • or anything that you think may be of interest

*Aware that some UK colleagues are striking today and may not feel able to participate today, I hereby extend Internation Women’s Day to 2 days – just like that !

Open by Accident

In 1996, I was lecturing in Information Systems in the Department of Computer and Mathematical Sciences at University of Salford.  A colleague ran a Lotus Notes Server (under his desk as I recall) that hosted a Student Information System – and I had an account on the server for that reason.

And then – Lotus released the Domino server  that transformed from just a Notes server to become an Interactive Web server ! What was posted on a Notes Server could be shared on the Web.

Wow!

I had looked enviously at Universities that offered tilde Web spaces for staff and sometimes students, but had no idea how I could persuade IT Services, or learn HTML alongside all my other commitments.

But now, I had a user account that enabled me to create Lotus Notes databases that would allow students to access and engage with what I published on a MS Office template database. So I just uploaded Word and Powerpoint documents to Lotus Notes, and there they were – on the Web. OK so the urls were a nightmare, but I was sharing course resources openly.  And I could sync the databases to my home computer, reducing my dialup charges.

My intention was that students could access resources but I soon realised that other educators were finding my stuff, and contacting me. This encouraged me in different ways: I adopted a more scholarly approach to citation/referencing in slideshows; and I was able to share resources as my network increased. Later, a colleague who joined us from another university told me how much she valued my stuff and we worked to create new web materials together when we team taught a large module.

I had also discovered the Notes Discussion template, and realised that I could set up Discussion spaces for students (and invite others) where they could have conversations that were shared but not in the public domain.

And then, an institutional reorganisation happened and I lost access to the Lotus Notes server and had to learn HTML in a month but that’s another story !

This is a bricolage story for #101openstories. Find out more and share your open story at https://101openstories.wordpress.com/welcome/